Ossining Library Showcases Croton Man's India Photos

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Photographer Daniel Oppenheim is showcasing his photographs of Indians at the Ossining Public Library.
Photographer Daniel Oppenheim is showcasing his photographs of Indians at the Ossining Public Library. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Daniel Oppenheim

OSSINING, N.Y. -- Croton-on-Hudson resident Daniel Oppenheim has been all around the world and has the photos to prove it.

Oppenheim's photography of his trip to India will be on display at the Ossining Public Library on Friday, Aug. 1. A reception will be held Saturday, Aug. 2, from 2-4 p.m., and a gallery talk will take place Aug. 13. The exhibit runs through Aug. 30.

Oppenheim traveled to India three years ago on a business trip and ended up visiting the slums of India. 

"There was an intimacy and a connection I made with the people there," Oppenheim said. "This was a big departure for me. It was a big deal. These people have a level of nothing you just can't imagine."

Despite the cultural differences, Oppenheim was able to strike up a conversation and began taking photographs that affected him.

"We were able to relate to each other," Oppenheim said. "We had such an immediate intimate connection. These prints started talking to me. These people were looking straight at me, and I found it astounding."

Previously, Oppenheim had taken photographs in Jamaica and Austria.

"It just wasn't the same," Oppenheim said. "These people look straight into the camera. It makes me want to go back and be with those guys. They were all nice and polite and really sincere. Somehow I managed to capture all that. It's not just India, it's humanity."

Oppenheim said his subjects were very receptive to having their picture taken.

"When people look at the pictures, they ask me if they were staged or if I had helpers," Oppenheim said. "Absolutely not. This had a huge effect me, and I'm still trying to figure it out."

The photographer also believes he learned some important life lessons from the trip.

"At the end of the day, it's not about what you have, but it's about the relationships and connections you've made," Oppenheim said. "Possessions are not important, they are not going anywhere. It's about talking to people and making good connections."​

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